How to Find a Reputable Breeder:

How can you find a reputable breeder?
 
1. Contact the National Weimaraner Council, DogsWest or a local Weimaraner breed club, and request names of reputable breeders in your area.

2. Attend dog shows and talk to breeders, handlers and other owners who may be able to give you referrals on obtaining a puppy. Information on dog shows in your area is
available by contacting the DogsWest in the activities & events section.

Some questions to ask the breeder:

1.
How long have you been breeding Weimaraners? Good breeders have usually been breeding for a minimum of 3 or 4 years. If you are buying a puppy from a breeder's
first or second litter, they should be able to tell you about their own experience, mentors,and advisors.

2. Do you belong to any Weimaraner Clubs in Australia and are you a member of the Australian National Kennel Council (ANKC)? Membership in these clubs involves
working within a code of ethics that gives greater credibility to a breeder and exchanging current information about the breed.

3. In what type of activities do your dogs participate? Many reputable breeders are involved in conformation competition (showing) and/or in various performance events such as tracking, agility, obedience, retrieving or field work. 

4. Do you have any puppies available, and if not, when do you plan to have another litter? If they have puppies available in the near future, the majority of breeders
will put your name on a waiting list. Breeders whose lists are full are usually more than willing to refer you to other reputable breeders. In some parts of the country,
there is sometimes a shortage of Weimaraner puppies. A good quality puppy from a reputable breeder is worth waiting for. Don’t be in a hurry!

5. What kind of warranty do you offer on your puppies? Most breeders will guarantee the health of a puppy for a specific period of time and if something does go wrong
will either offer to replace the puppy with another one or give a partial or full refund of the purchase price.

6. What genetic screening do you do? What steps are you taking to try to eliminate the main genetic problems in Weimaraners? (hip dysplasia, immunodeficiency, HOD)
What is the verifiable health status of this puppy’s parents?

7. What is the price of the puppy? How is payment to be made? If you ask the price of the puppy as your first question, that can turn off somebreeders. You can economize on lots of things like petrol and clothing, but economizing on your puppy is being penny-wise and pound-foolish. A puppy with a bargain price may have temperament and/or health issues that will cost you many thousands of dollars -- and quite possibly much heartache -- over the life of the dog.

8. When do I get the registration papers? Breeders will offer to sell your puppy on either Limited or Main register. A good breeder will ask you what you are interested in participating in with your puppy and place on a specific register accordingly. Limited Register puppies are not able to be shown or bred, but can participate in other activities offered by the ANKC, such as tracking, obedience and agility. Main register puppies are able to be shown and also bred, and you are able to register those puppies with the ANKC. A good breeder will be very careful in placing puppies on the main register, and will probably want to be clear of your intentions with the puppy if you request main register papers.

9. At what age do you place your puppies? In contrast to puppy mills or backyard breeders, which may place puppies as early as 6 weeks, reputable breeders usually
don’t place puppies before about 8 or 9 weeks of age to ensure healthy social development. Also note that it is against the law, and ANKC regulations, to place
puppies under 8 weeks of age, so be wary of a breeder that offers you a pup younger than 8 weeks.

10. What type of paper work do you provide with your puppies? Reputable breeders should provide a Receipt of Sale, a contract detailing the conditions of sale, a copy
of the puppy’s health (including worming) and vaccination record, a pedigree, and ANKC registration papers. In some cases, breeders may withhold ANKC registration
papers until a successful trial period has been completed.

11. Do you have recommendations that I should follow when I bring my puppy home? Most breeders will provide some form of puppy pack that includes their own recommendations on care, diet and training of the puppy.

12. Are your puppies raised in your house or in a kennel? Are they well socialised with adults, children and other dogs? Wherever the puppies are raised, the breeder should be spending a lot of quality time with each puppy on a daily basis, and exposing the puppy to different sights and sounds.

13. Do you pick my puppy for me and why? It is not unusual for reputable breeders to match puppies with new homes based on the owners goals, lifestyle, interests, and
family situation. The breeder spends 24/7 with the puppies and knows far better than anyone else what they are like. You can trust the breeder’s experience to match you
to the right puppy. Often this decision cannot be made until the puppies are at least seven weeks old because of tooth alignment, presence of male parts, show
potential, performance potential, and personality traits, all factors that enter into the decision of which puppy goes where, are not fully known until at least 7 weeks of age, with many breeders not making their final assessment until 8 or 9 weeks of age.

Questions the breeder may ask you:

1. Have you ever owned dogs before and specifically, a Weimaraner?
Familiarity with owning dogs ensures a higher success rate in placing a puppy in a new home. It is a particular “plus” if a prospective buyer has had the experience of owning a unique breed like the Weimaraner.

2. Why do you want a Weimaraner? It is important to determine if the active, demanding Weimaraner will be the right choice for a new buyer. Weimaraners require a lot of time with their owners, as well as regular exercise, preferably with their owners. Does the new owner have the time and inclination for this commitment?

3. Do you have an enclosed or fenced-in backyard? As a breed that has absolute devotion to their owners, they may try to escape their yard to seek you out. Their
keen nose may also enhance their desire to roam and seek out activity. They maybecome injured or lost if not contained by a fenced yard. Chaining an Weimaraner (or
any breed) to an outdoor doghouse or tree is both dangerous and inhumane.

4. Where will your new puppy live? The intense desire to be with their owners means that the Weimaraner is best being with you when you are home. Weimaraners are happiest in the house where they can be cared for by loving family members. Weimaraners were bred to hunt with their owners all day and sleep at night inside the hunting lodge with their owners.

5. How long will the puppy be alone during the day? Breeders are reluctant to place a Weimaraner puppy in a home where it will be alone for excessively long periods. The companionship of another dog will go a long way in providing companionship for a breed like the Weimaraner if you can’t be there.

6. Are you willing to desex your pet Weimaraner? Spaying or neutering is usually required by breeders who wish to protect their bloodlines, as well as keeping the numbers of unwanted dogs low... Spaying or neutering can make living with the Weimaraner or any breed a positive experience as there may be less territoriality and possible marking in males and no heat cycles in females.

7. Can you afford not only the purchase price of this pet but also its care and maintenance throughout its life? New owners need to be aware of how much it costs to keep their family pet healthy. Regular veterinary care is essentials in the well maintained Weimaraner life.

8. Is the decision to purchase a Weimaraner a unanimous one in your family? If you don’t have complete agreement within the family, do not purchase a new pet.

9.  Do you have children or grandchildren, and if so, what are their ages? Many families want a puppy to “grow up with” their children. For some families with small children, the breeder may recommend an adult dog whose behavior is more settled and reliable around a child’s exuberant nature. Weimaraners, while good with children, can also be quite exuberant and therefore, a little clumsy. At all times, you should ensure correct supervision of your dog with children, and ensure that the child/children do not show inappropriate behaviour or cruelty towards your dog.

10. Would you like to become a member of the Weimaraner Social Club of WA and/or DogsWest? Benefits of WSCWA membership include access to the monthly Newsletter, introductions to other Weimaraner fanciers, voting privileges in Weimaraner club elections, announcements of activities and issues affecting the breed, as well as invitations to lots of fun activities. It also tells the breeder that you are interested in the breed and in socialising your new puppy with other dogs and involving yourself in breed specific activities.